Jim Thorpe

Lucky Lord Jim O`Neill..Baron of Gately

Yes, I am back…sadly, not by popular demand…So, lucky Lord Jim gets a knighthood for being totally wrong…what do I get for being totally right?

I know I have been away for a long time but I am busy trying to help my constituents in what is the most deprived ward of my London Borough. I do get the time to tweet and quite frankly, if I do say myself, there is some interesting twitshit going down. I will start again at some point when my workload calms down. TO FOLLOW GO #financereaper…

Anyone who has read my blog for a while will know that I have had a downer on Lucky Lord Jim`s BRICs for about two years. I identified the fault with his reasoning and started warning of the BRICs impending doom. Today, Goldman Sachs have affectively closed their once famous BRIC fund. It has lost 88% of its value since 2010. In the last two years, I have warned that all the main winners in the BRIC argument would eventually fall from grace. BHP Billiton, one of my regular posts (bear ideas) of the past, has hit a seven year low. Steel companies are in the depths of despair. Coal was a big subject matter and I even wrote about the history of a little town in the USA called Jim Thorpe. Well, the Coal industry continues to slump and now Chinese mining company Longmay mining is laying off 100,000 employees. In fact, as many as are employed in the entire US coal industry…of course, US employees with their modern machinery investment and methods are 20 times more productive…oh, and they don’t live on a bowl of rice a week…Iron Ore will not rally as many expect. Oil will not rally as many expect. In fact, we could see new lows. Machinery manufacturers have also come into my spot light and I have continually warned of the fragility of their earnings…just look at companies like Joy Global, mentioned here many times…I have been totally right and I will continue to be so. QE is the primary reason. Central Banks have not used this tool wisely. Instead of extracting hard and fast commitments from politicians to cut spending and put in place debt reduction plans, they have worked hand in hand to raise still further the levels of debt to GDP ratios. Since the crash, global government indebtedness has risen 30%…

QE has led to over capacity. Yes, hundreds of millions of Chinese have come from the paddy fields to industrial towns and cities but it was all too quick. The cheap money has allowed huge capital spending of productive industries but at a cost to employment in developed nations. As one million extremely poorly paid manufacturing workers in China start work, jobs of very high equivalent salary workers are lost. The net result is a loss of demand. Whilst the infrastructure explosion, which took over ten years, was in full swing, all well and good…that is now past its peak, the Chinese economy has to focus more on exports than ever before. If it was to keep those hundreds of millions poor people working…they needed to export or die…that is exactly what they are doing. The 2015 trade surplus is up 75% to date. The real worry for the west is that in reality profitability is of little consideration compared to keeping people working . Therefore, the response of other developed and even developing nation’s is fairly limited.

Smoot-Hawley…lets not hope that the only way out it is trade barriers, however, currently there are 30 trade sanctions being drawn up against Chinese Steel dumping. Their are many other areas where dumping is evident. This will not end well.

 

 

 

 

is of little interest.

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Monday, November 9th, 2015 BRICs, China, Consumer Debt, Debt, GDP, Japan, National Debt, QE, Steel No Comments

Italy Could Beat UKIP To Braking The EU

Finally, the good ship Gravy Train is taking on water below the water line. Comments by Beppe Grillo, leader of the 5 Star political movement, will send a shudder down the necks of the overpaid numties dictating how Europeans should go about their daily lives with little concern for the misery they are causing.

“We must leave the Euro as soon as possible” said the learder of a party that polled 21.5% in the recent European Elections…This will be, if it becomes reality, a hammer blow to the German economy. No self respecting politician in the Mediterranean Countries would be able to stay if it happened and Germany would be uncovered as the worlds biggest exporter hiding in a weak currency. Of course, this is only one voice in the Italian political arena but Beppe has a soild following and the black hole of debt that is facing the government will only force voters into his clutches.

This is what I wrote in February this year in my Article Nothing Sucks Like an Electrolux …I still believe the simple solution is GERPELLED …Germany Expelled

….Germany to be expelled from the Euro. I first hinted at this in The Elephant in the Room (June 2012) and again in Kurzarbeit achieved where Blitzkrieg Failed (January 2013)…basically Germany is hiding in a weak economic zone to conquer the export world with an unfair advantage.

GLOBAL UPDATE…

China.. Sales of excavators fell in September by 33% versus 2012…This is an acceleration of the 15% decline seen during the first nine months. Regular readers will know how important construction in China is to the Economy.,..If the Chinese economy is expanding anywhere near the 7.5% it states…You can call me Waung Kin Phil!!!

Slowing House sales means slowing Excavator sales which means slower Steel sales which means slower Iron Ore/Coal sales which means slower Shipping traffic which means slower ship sales which means slower Steel sales whi…you get the point I guess…

 

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Amazing Performance: Part 1

Nine Year lows for Steel companies!!!

As an update to my big calls in 2012 I am going to start with the subject which has taken up most of my verbiage, STEEL. I am so pleased with the results that you could say I am;

Inebriated with the exuberance of my own verbosity. I first heard this phrase as a child quoted by my amazing aunt Nancy who is still with us today and rapidly approaching 100! Of course, the 19th century British Prime Minister, Benjamin Disraeli, is credited with it first.

I digress. Back in May last year I wrote Are Steel Producers a Buy? The share price chart of two steel companies were highlighted. ArcelorMittal and US Steel.  I said then, and still say today, that oversupply in China and a lack of final demand in the world will keep downward pressure on the steel sector. So how have these companies fared since then? ArcelorMittal is 23% lower and US Steel is 34% lower. Lets not forget that the market has risen around 15% since then so the net affect has been very dramatic. Also mentioned negatively in the blog were Joy Global and Caterpillar and they are down 14% and 13% respectively. The truth is I started warning about the Steel sector back in January 2012 with the BRICs and Steel blog. I tied the fortunes of the BRICs to this sector as, in my opinion, it was the demand for the raw material, Iron Ore, that drove the fortunes of the BRIC economies. As I stated then, Jim O`Niell was lucky that when coining this now famous acronym, the Chinese authorities were prepared to spend vast fortunes on infrastructure projects (which are of course steel dominant) and the stupid governments of the west were allowing the finance industry to lend beyond the realms of their normal Avarice. Since January 2012 specialist Iron Ore and Coal producer Cliffs Natural Resources has fallen around 70% but my favourite pick (for a short) in the May blog and since has been BHP. I stated then that I thought it had 30% downside. So far it is down 3% (still not forgetting the market is up 15%). Luckily for me, it has just broken a five year uptrend which points to a decline to the £16.50 triple four year bottom support (-12% from current price).

Chinese inventories of Steel are at an all time high and growing. The authorities, as I have stated many times, are more interested in employing the masses than making a profit. Hence the 98% fall in profit last year. The production capacity is frightening. They are not concerned with the steel companies around the globe. Interestingly, tighter controls by Europe on wider steel pipe imports (from China) were announced and the US Military have just stated that all military supplies must be made from US produced steel. Other countries are doing similar things (Smoot-Hawley anyone).

China is taking a similar of attitude to employment over profit in other industries. Solar panels, Aluminium and more importantly Shipping. In a way it is a grander version of Kurzarbeit see Kurzarbeit achieved where Blitzkrieg failed!.

Amazing Performance: Part 2 Reviews the staggering gains from my recommendations in Be Prepared for a Wedgefest October 2012

MASSIVE Japanese QE. Let me be quite clear. Japan will not, and has no intention of, creating strong domestic demand. With the devaluation of the Yen (Japan has no fossil fuels) and the significant increases in consumer taxes 2014/15, disposable income will be squeezed even further. Yes, I hear you, they have potentially large shale gas reserves but that will take years at those depths. They have only one intention, export and survive. I have written at length about the ills of Japanese government debt and the demographic eruption. If you think this large QE will help global demand, think again. Japan has suffered greatly with the strong Yen. Its traditionally strong heavy industries of Steel and Shipbuilding were decimated. They intend to regain the upper hand. Asian countries are faced with a global exporter (in many fields) which has huge spare capacity and technological know how and they intend to compete.

 

 

 

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Friday, April 5th, 2013 BRICs, China, Debt, Japan, Predictions, QE, Shipping, Steel, Yen No Comments

US Economic update

BNSF Weekly rail shipments.

Regular readers will know that I have relied on this data to give a view of the economy. Transportation is the most important bellweather for economic activity. New readers might want to view an earlier blog The Perfect Storm for an overview. The updated chart (click to enlarge) does not really add much to last update in early May. Motor vehicles continue the trend but  metals growth is weaken as imported vehicles improve market share. Lumber confirms the stronger demand from the housing sector. Total freight shows no sighs of altering its lacklustre, low growth position. The significant year on year decline in coal movement is coming to an end as this was driven by both lower gas prices and warm winter weather. The rest of the year should stabilise at lower levels but not adversely affect Total Freight as in Q1 and 2. I have talked about my Jim Thorpe concerns for the coal industry and its suppliers on several occasions so it was interesting to see Caterpillar mention (this week) the slowdown in demand from that segment of their business. Sadly things will get far worse. If you look at the inventory build up in the worlds biggest coal user (China) you will understand why I am so negative. It is not only coal that is piling up, the products that need huge energy imput to produce are also building. Steel production will have to be cut drastically in the Q3 if a price implosion is to be avoided. This may support steel prices but the knock on affects to Coal, Iron Ore and many other commodities (not to mention Shipping) will be significant. Interestingly, new car inventory at Chinese dealerships is building rapidly. Sales data are registered when delivered to the dealer, so, with inventory as high as 60 days sales on the forecourt, the only response will be heavy discounting. Going forward this will weaken demand.

Shipping is never far from my blogs so I will not disappoint. Europe/Asia container route pricing by the World Container Index has fallen for each of the last five weeks and is eroding the rate increases forced through by the big carriers. The weakening Baltic Index is confirming the growing level of inventory of dry bulk commodities. I hope to have an update on the regular Suez Canal data next week, that is if I can get a good Internet signal in Tenerife. Happy days!

 

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Friday, June 8th, 2012 BNSF, China, GDP, Predictions, Shipping, Steel, US Economy No Comments

Are Steel Producers a Buy?

The building block of life.

BRICs and Steel part 1 was published late January. Since then, shares in the sector (STEEL) have fallen between 20-30%. The attached charts of ArcelorMittal (World No1 player) and US Steel show the stocks on major support lines. I am not a professional technician (only a lowly landscape gardener/designer) but the 200 day moving average crossed below the 100 day average  on the downside.  I guess it warns of a total failure in the share price. However, having seen a significant pullback to date and trading in the support area, I am not going to suggest a collapse. What I will say is that if you are in the recovery camp and believe that the central banks can add sufficient economic stimulus, then this would be a good time to buy. Of course, anyone familiar with my blogs on the heavy industries will be aware that I believe that the huge over capacity will prevail for many years. China will try and export its way out of a growing inventory position. Its steel makers are producing at a breakeven cost. The only way steel makers can elicit some profit is for the Chinese government to ease monetary policy at a breakneck pace (not going to happen until inflation is under control) or Iron Ore prices fall. Iron Ore faces three significant headwinds. First, demand. Yes I hear you! New car sales in the USA are growing rapidly but do me a favour. Go and calculate the weight of 14 million cars in 1995 and then weigh the estimated 14 million cars of 2012. I bet 2012 weighs 20-30 less. Construction is still growing in China but at a slower pace. Shipbuilding orders are collapsing. European overall steel demand? Car sales falling rapidly whilst countries like Spain who built 800,000 properties in the boom will have only 60,000 in 2012 (see also Ireland… Never was a slik purse!) Second, recycling. Per ton prices for ships going to the knackers yard are falling due to too many ships and not enough beaches. Recycled steel generally needs no Iron Ore. Third, Inventory. As I have highlighted on several occasions, inventory is at record levels. Yes I know production of steel is at record levels but demand is not keeping up. A recent report by Hexun indicated that 500 of the total 1600 Chinese shipbuilders will close in 2012 (reference my blogs on Shipping).

 

The BRIC nations plus Australia have boomed with the price of Iron Ore. As the chart shows, from sub $20 to $200 in 10 years. I believe the current price of $145 is vulnerable to a further 10-20% pullback. How the large producers Vale, BHP, Rio Tinto and Fortescue handle this scenario is anyones guess. Cost reductions via a curtailment of machinery/transportation investment may be the result. Since the BRIC and Steel blog Joy Global has fallen 30% with the more diverse Caterpillar down 16%. I am of the belief that the mining stocks still have a lot of downside. Shipping stocks have fallen around 25% (ex AP MoellerMaersk only -12%). If Iron Ore demand weakens, they are all vulnerable as to are the banks that have direct debt exposure (see previous blogs).  Lets not forget Coal, another important factor in Steel production. Maybe fracking and a decline in Steel demand will lead to more towns like Jim Thorpe which at one time had more millionaires than any other town. I have stayed there and whitewater rafted in the nearby river. Lovely place!

 

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Monday, May 7th, 2012 China, GDP, Shipping, Steel 3 Comments
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