Quantitative Easing (QE)

What is QE?

Printing or creating vast quantities of paper or electronic money by supposedly intelligent people (Central Bankers) on behalf of the population of a country to

Allow Compliment Condone Encourage supposedly intelligent people (Politicians) to borrow and spend vast sums of money on behalf of the population of a country.

Q: What has been done with the QE proceeds?

A: Buy Assets

Q: What Assets?

A: Firstly Government Bonds, then lesser quality bonds and fixed income securities…and now Equities.

Q: What is the impact on these assets?

A: Given they all have, to varying degrees, a finite supply, they have all gained substantially in value, driving interest rates and future returns on investment much lower.

Q: Who has benefited from QE?

A: Generally the wealthiest 10% of society who tend to have savings ex pension in these assets

Q: Who suffers?

A: Generally speaking, the poor and the majority of pensioners who have little more than the basic defined contribution pensions.

Q:Why them?

A: The excess of cheap money is primarily channeled into balance sheet repair for banks and low cost speculation investment in commodities etc which has kept inflation stubbornly high whilst annuity rates have imploded with lower bond yields.

Q: Why has demand not rocketed with the record low interest rates that have resulted in QE?

A: Since the 1960`s politicians have used the magic wand of increased debt to buy their way out of economic downturns (see Economic Seismic Shift)  but debt, both private and public in most major economies is past being able to grow as before. Additionally, commodity inflation has lead to a fall in disposable incomes.

The long term implications are as yet unknown but a quick reflection on what forms an asset valuation. When assets are exchanged in a trade, an assumption is made by both parties about the current and future value of those assets. For instance, when the Native Indians sold Manhattan in 1626 to the Dutch both parties were happy with the trade. Of course the shiny trinkets given to the Indians indicate just how badly valuations of assets can be perceived in the future. History might be as equally harsh when it looks back on QE. Asset valuation is based on two important factors. Supply and Demand. Look at the difference in valuation of a Van Gogh masterpiece and a Zimbabwe 100 trillion dollar note. Whilst masterpieces of this quality have a very finite supply, awful political and economic policy of the Zimbabwe government lead to a supply of untold magnitude. Sound familiar?

Currently, the levels of debt being amassed by some (most) developed economies are approaching a point of no return. Of course some lesser countries have already cir cum to reality. The debt has been grown in the compost of progress and society. It was thought to have been used to build a better life for today and tomorrow. Whilst it has to be said life for many has been greatly improved that cant be said for all. Whats more, it has only improved life for the yesterday and today. The tomorrow has been totally forgotten. Sadly, vast political and government empires have flourished.

I am firmly in the camp that believes we must face our demons and cut government spending drastically. Yes this will cause significant economic hardship, but it will be a hardship more even than QE. Commodity prices will get crushed and allow us to rebuild a fairer society in the future. Of course, the wealthy will be screaming from the rooftops 1930`s style. It has come to pass that I must quote Churchill in his first speech to the House of Commons after being made Prime Minister during the first and worst year of WW11.

“I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears, and sweat,” He knew that when faced with adversity a country has to dig deep together in order to move forward. QE is just delaying the inevitable at the expense of all in society who will be made to pick up the bill whilst in the meantime, only a small proportion enjoy the riches it bestowes.

Other very apt Churchill quotes:

  • There is no such thing as a good tax.
  • If you are going to go through hell, keep going.
  • We contend that for a nation to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.
  • Some see private enterprise as a predatory target to be shot, others as a cow to be milked, but few are those who see it as a sturdy horse pulling the wagon
  • You can always count on Americans to do the right thing—after they’ve tried everything else.

Next blog topics….I am watching the hefty falls in the Shanghai Container Index with interest. …Japan consumption will implode over the next 12 months as food prices jump 10-15% in Q1 and the 2014 consumption tax arrives….BRICs are still a target of mine and going to suffer…Gold, I forecast in January that it will hit $1,000 before $2,000. Looking good.

 

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Saturday, April 27th, 2013 BRICs, Consumer Debt, Debt, National Debt, Predictions, QE

4 Comments to Quantitative Easing (QE)

  1. […] […]

  2. Is Stephen King a plagiarist? | Finance Reaper on May 24th, 2013
  3. […] we have economic growth but we also have growing poverty. see Quantitative Easing. This is just as I forecast back at the beginning of 2012. Job creation but no deep rooted wealth […]

  4. Osborne Good Fortune Financed by Pensioners and Savers. | Finance Reaper on October 22nd, 2013
  5. […] 400 Richest people have more than the combined wealth than the poorest 50% see Quantitative Easing […]

  6. AMERICA: The Home of the the Free?…No, The Home of the Fool! | Finance Reaper on October 27th, 2013
  7. […] […]

  8. Profound Inequality in America…Time to Act! | Finance Reaper on December 5th, 2013

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